Urinary Incontinence in Pets: Basics for Natural Prevention

Urinary incontinence is a big issue for pets and their owners. Not only is incontinence extremely inconvenient, but we feel sad for our dogs and cats with bladder control issues. This makes preventing incontinence in our pets very important. As a loving and caring pet parent, you want to know what to do when incontinence is plaguing your older dogs or cats. 

Urinary Incontinence in Pets

WHAT IS URINARY INCONTINENCE?

Urinary incontinence occurs when a house-trained dog or cat loses control of their bladder.  This loss of control can range from the occasional small urine leak to the often, and large urine spill.

THE CAUSES OF PET URINARY INCONTINENCE:

  • Hormonal imbalance
  • Genetics: Weak bladder, anatomic disorders, abnormalities
  • Injuries to the spinal cord
  • Prostate disorders
  • Excessive drinking (could be a sign of diabetes or kidney disease)

We know the above are scary and seem very serious; but usually the cause has to do with the urinary tract (i.e. infections, stones etc.). These can be addressed pretty straight –forwardly.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE INCONTINENCE IN YOUR PET: 

  • Dripping urine and/or irritated skin (redness) near the urethral opening
  • Excessive licking of the vulva or penis area.
  • Wetness or urine smell near where your pet sleeps.

BREEDS SUSCEPTIBLE TO INCONTINENCE:

Urinary incontinence can afflict dogs of any age, breed, gender. It is most often seen in the following:

  • Middle-aged to older spayed females
  • Doberman pinschers
  • Old English sheepdogs
  • Cocker spaniels
  • Springer spaniels

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I THINK MY DOG IS INCONTINENT?

Consult with a veterinarian. They will confirm the diagnosis and try to determine a cause by a thorough exam and urinalysis. If it is an infection they will likely prescribe antibiotics.

WHAT TO DO POST-ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OR POST-INFECTION

Antibiotics do kill infection, but they also can kill the healthy bacteria that protect the bladder. This creates a vicious loop and often leads to many cycles of the drugs and recurring incontinence. For this reason, after antibiotics, we recommend therapeutic doses of probiotics to stabilize the gut and and bladder ecology.  Additionally, there a natural measures you can take to ensure better bladder health for your dogs and cats.

A NATURAL APPROACH TO BLADDER AND URINARY SUPPORT

  • Utrin™: Cranberry and D-Mannose formulation. These nutrients inhibit the adhesion of the pathogenic bacteria to the bladder and  help flush them from the body. As a preventive measure, this item is very useful for animals prone to bladder and urinary infections. Utrin™ is a "must have" for good bladder health.
  • Probiotic Miracle®:  One of the best ways to build foundational immunity, and keeping animals prone to infection, is with probiotics. You may be surprised to learn this, but, by populating the gut with healthy bacteria, many other systems in the body, including the urinary tract, benefit. This fact has been demonstrated in numerous studies and is currently realized by countless pet owners that give their pets probiotics.


Utrin™

Results: 90% reduction in pathogenic bacteria attachment in the urinary tract

Features:

  • Gluten free
  • Dairy free
  • Made in USA
  • Money-back guarantee

Probiotic Miracle®

Results: 94% agreed that Probiotic Miracle made their pets healthier with significant improvements in symptoms caused by yeast and bacterial overgrowth.

Features:

  • Contains pet-specific researched bacterial strains
  • No Fillers, flavors or byproducts
  • Made in the USA
  • Money-back guarantee

OTHER TIPS TO MANAGE URINARY INCONTINENCE IN DOGS

  • Sleeping area: Keep blankets clean, and consider waterproof bedding to absorb moisture.
  • Walks: Take your dog out more often; first thing in the morning and shortly after naps.
  • Provide proper hygiene: Keep your dog clean to prevent any related skin infections.

By applying the above suggestions you can get your pet’s urinary incontinence in control!

bladder incontinence uti

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